As beach towns open, businesses are short foreign workers
BOSTON (AP) — At this time of the year, The Friendly Fisherman on Cape Cod is usually bustling with foreign students clearing tables and helping prepare orders of clam strips or fish and chips.
Fire destroys much of 249-year-old church in California
SAN GABRIEL, Calif. (AP) — A fire early Saturday destroyed the rooftop and most of the interior of a Catholic church in California that was undergoing renovation to mark its upcoming 250th anniversary celebration.
Q&A: US government not as prolific an executioner as states
CHICAGO (AP) — Executions carried out by federal authorities have stopped, restarted and stopped again for long stretches since the first one in 1790, when U.S.
Coronavirus deaths take a long-expected turn for the worse
NEW YORK (AP) — A long-expected upturn in U.S. coronavirus deaths has begun, driven by fatalities in states in the South and West, according to data on the pandemic.
Pandemic, racism compound worries about Black suicide rate
CHICAGO (AP) — Jasmin Pierre was 18 when she tried to end her life, overdosing on whatever pills she could find. Diagnosed with depression and anxiety, she survived two more attempts at suicide, which felt like the only way to stop her pain.
Pistons' onetime home, the Palace of Auburn Hills, torn down
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP) — One of Michigan's most beloved sports and entertainment venues was turned into rubble on Saturday with a series of controlled explosions.
Disney World reopens as coronavirus cases surge in Florida
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — “The Most Magical Place on Earth” has reopened after nearly four months with new rules in place to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
Police execute search warrant at home of gun-toting couple
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Authorities executed a search warrant at the St. Louis mansion of a white couple whose armed defense of their home during a recent racial injustice protest drew widespread attention, their attorney confirmed Saturday.
Johns Hopkins sues to block rule on international students
BALTIMORE (AP) — Johns Hopkins University has filed a lawsuit seeking to block the Trump administration's decision to make international students leave the U.S.
Foreign students weigh studying in person vs. losing visas
PHOENIX (AP) — International students worried about a new immigration policy that could potentially cost them their visas say they feel stuck between being unnecessarily exposed during the coronavirus pandemic and being able to finish their studies in America.
California couple agrees to guilty pleas in college scam
BOSTON (AP) — A California couple agreed Friday to plead guilty to paying $250,000 to get their daughter into the University of Southern California as a fake volleyball recruit.
Shipbuilder files complaint over union threats during strike
Navy shipbuilder Bath Iron Works on Friday filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board, accusing its largest union of threatening workers who cross the picket line during an ongoing strike in Maine.
Ex-Trump fixer Cohen returned to prison where sentence began
NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump’s former lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, was transferred to the same federal lockup in Otisville where he was serving time for tax evasion, lying to Congress and campaign finance crimes before the coronavirus pandemic prompted his early release, his attorney said Friday.
Lawyer: Over 150 Minneapolis officers seeking disability
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — More than 150 Minneapolis police officers are filing work-related disability claims after the death of George Floyd and ensuing unrest, with about three-quarters citing post-traumatic stress disorder as the reason for their planned departures, according to an attorney representing the officers.
Border authorities use pandemic powers to expel immigrants
SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Honduran woman was nine months' pregnant and exhausted with stomach pain when the Border Patrol found her in the Southern California mountains with her longtime partner and their 9-year-old son.
No bail for 2 accused of helping ex-Nissan boss escape Japan
BOSTON (AP) — A Massachusetts father and son who prosecutors say helped smuggle Nissan’s former chairman out of Japan last year were denied bail by a federal judge in Boston on Friday.
Florida's curve no longer flat amid new surge of virus cases
MIAMI (AP) — Fighting a surge in coronavirus cases in the spring, Florida appeared to be “flattening the curve” as theme parks shuttered, sugar sand beaches closed and residents heeded orders to stay home.
Mexican American man charged with hate crime in fatal crash
FOND DU LAC, Wis. (AP) — A Mexican American man from Wisconsin is charged with homicide as a hate crime because prosecutors say he intentionally crashed his pickup truck into a motorcyclist and killed the man because he was white.
Takeaways: Paycheck Protection loans and the Catholic Church
NEW YORK (AP) — When the coronavirus pandemic caused a broad economic downturn and Depression-era unemployment rates, Washington responded with trillions of dollars in federal relief.
Ex-Trump lawyer Michael Cohen back in federal prison
NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, was returned to federal prison Thursday, after balking at certain conditions of the home confinement he was granted because of the coronavirus pandemic.
Schools or bars? Opening classrooms may mean hard choices
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — President Donald Trump insists that schools reopen this fall. Many parents, educators, doctors and economists want the same thing.
Worker advocates file meat plants discrimination complaint
Several worker advocacy organizations have filed a civil rights complaint with the U.S. Department of Agriculture alleging that meat processing companies Tyson and JBS have engaged in racial discrimination during the coronavirus pandemic.
Appeals court pauses lawsuit over Trump hotel profits
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Financial records related to President Donald Trump’s Washington hotel can be kept on hold, a federal appeals court said Thursday, while Trump asks the U.S.
Medical experts: Floyd's speech didn't mean he could breathe
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — As George Floyd repeatedly pleaded “I can’t breathe” to police officers holding him down on a Minneapolis street corner, some of the officers responded by pointing out he was able to speak.
Latino group launches $10M campaign to boost voter turnout
PHOENIX (AP) — A national organization is announcing a $10 million campaign to turn out Hispanic voters in several of this year's battleground states.